Archives for the month of: December, 2014
data

Wired to go. Wire? Wire not? Image: Darwin Bell, Flickr

Where are your data? How would you feel if somebody contacted you and asked to see it? Public access to research data is an initiative being driven forward by big research funders, influential societies and government. In essence the aim is to ensure transparency and reflect the right to access information through the Freedom of Information Act.

Data Management Plans are now a common part of the application process for research funding and the EPSRC helped roll the ball by mandating that research organisations comply with EPSRC expectations. These include making metadata (the data about data) available online in a way that is visible, searchable and accessible and that accurately represents the underlying research data, in most cases, 12 months after its generation. If access to the underlying data is restricted then the metadata must include the reasons for restriction and conditions of access. Research data must be available for a minimum of 10 years. All publications resulting from RCUK funding require a statement detailing how underlying data can be accessed.

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psychometrics-1

Previous blogs have focussed on enhancing researcher’s employability skills via career planning, job seeking skills such as coping with challenging application forms, and even new interview techniques such as Strengths Based Interviews.

So, what happens if you come up against a personality type question where an employer asks you have you would behave or react in certain situations? Would you tell them what you think they would like to hear i.e. you are an extrovert person even though you honestly feel that may not be your preferred style? What to do?

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In November, I attended the Vitae Research Staff Development Conference, which this year had the focus of ‘recognition and value’. There were many nuggets of wisdom shared but for the purposes of this post, I am going to ponder the pendulum that swings between value we take from the perception of us by others and the value we give to ourselves.

Nathaniel Branden, author of “The Six Pillars of Self Esteem”, states on his website;
“To achieve a healthy level of self-esteem, you must be able to accept who you are and be confident about your decisions and behavior. But there is another important ingredient in the development of self-esteem that is often overlooked, the ability to take responsibility for your future. To live self-responsibly, you must be able to influence your behavior freely in three major areas:

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This is a guest post from Suzy Firkin, an Associate Consultant for WISE on such topics as gender diversity, coaching and mentoring. WISE helps organisations to inspire women and girls to pursue STEM subjects as pathways to exciting and fulfilling careers. Their aim is to get 1 million more women into the STEM sector by 2020, boosting the talent pool to drive economic growth. 
 

Wise Logo Just recently research Fellowships have been tapping at my consciousness and I felt compelled to write a line or two about two excellent schemes that really aim to make a difference to the diversity of the STEM academic community.

At the recent WISE Awards Ceremony I was privileged to meet Dr Katie Perry of the Daphne Jackson Trust. (Daphne Jackson was the first female physics professor in the UK). Katie was being recognised at the ceremony for her inspirational leadership of the trust who offer unique fellowships designed to return scientists, technologists, engineers and mathematicians, who have had a career break of more than two years for family, caring or health reasons, back to research. During the last 10 years the Daphne Jackson trust has helped 250 STEM researchers return to their careers; 9 out of 10 have been women.

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03_early_researchers_001We are really very delighted to share with you that the Researcher Professional Development team won the Times Higher Education (THE) Award for Outstanding support for Early Career Researchers.

We always knew that Think Ahead was unique and it makes us really happy that it’s now recognised as the sector leader; both for the productive partnership model we operate (the theme of our entry), and the fact that the framework for the professional development of researchers is inclusive across all faculties and open to PGRs as well as research staff.

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