Archives for category: Michael Trikic

I have been working on projects for a while. I was a researcher (Technician, PhD, PDRA) so initially these were bioscience projects. Now I am a Project Officer in R&IS and manage and co-ordinate institutional projects that support research and researchers. I could tell you more, but won’t, the point is I gained transferable skills from my time doing research and I recently used this to write a ‘project planning check list’ to help me plan new projects. I share it below. Read the rest of this entry »

Impact, Impact everywhere but not a drop to drink.

Is impact an important part of the modern research landscape?

Yes, because achieving impact beyond academia is an important outcome of research and increasingly a formal requirement. It was part of the last REF (20% of the overall result) and research funders want to know how your work will be impactful.

No, because ‘Impact’ is not a modern phenomenon, academics/researchers have always made an impact, it is and always has been part of the job. Most of the best researchers are motivated by a greater purpose than just career progression and it is integral to their teaching. Whether it is through commercialisation of a new widget or process, developing treatments, informing policy, leading teaching practice, training future researchers or non-academic communication and outreach, there are many possible routes for research Impact to be realised.

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data

Wired to go. Wire? Wire not? Image: Darwin Bell, Flickr

Where are your data? How would you feel if somebody contacted you and asked to see it? Public access to research data is an initiative being driven forward by big research funders, influential societies and government. In essence the aim is to ensure transparency and reflect the right to access information through the Freedom of Information Act.

Data Management Plans are now a common part of the application process for research funding and the EPSRC helped roll the ball by mandating that research organisations comply with EPSRC expectations. These include making metadata (the data about data) available online in a way that is visible, searchable and accessible and that accurately represents the underlying research data, in most cases, 12 months after its generation. If access to the underlying data is restricted then the metadata must include the reasons for restriction and conditions of access. Research data must be available for a minimum of 10 years. All publications resulting from RCUK funding require a statement detailing how underlying data can be accessed.

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Obligatory fishy picture. Image: Georgie Pauwels, Flickr

Obligatory fishy picture. Image: Georgie Pauwels, Flickr

Researchfish is the system that many funders require researchers to record outcomes of the research they fund. This is important because if you get funding and then don’t do what the funder asks you to do they are unlikely to fund your work again.

As of September 2014 Research Councils UK (RCUK) replaced the unpopular and under used ROS with Researchfish. Researchfish was designed for the MRC (approximately 7 years ago) who opted not to use ROS. Subsequently it is being used by 90 or so funders, and these now including all RCUK funders.

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Start small before trying this. Image credit: Jeff Rowley, Flickr

Start small before trying this. Image credit: Jeff Rowley, Flickr

Do you want funding for your research question? Of course you do. It’s hard to do though isn’t it, especially for ECRs with no track record. To get research funding you need a track record so how do you get that?

By starting small before you go big, and this is where Research Professional comes in. It’s a large database of research funding opportunities that is updated twice weekly and has extensive coverage of funding opportunities available in the UK and beyond. Users can search the database and stay up to date with email alerts using search terms and filters. Search results include information about the calls, funder and eligibility, relevant links as well as any notes and comments.

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