Archives for posts with tag: distractions

Wnysoc-mediae talk a lot on this blog about the importance of being connected. Of having strong professional connections to help you as you develop your career, and of being connected to peers and colleagues within your discipline. It’s also certainly true that connecting with other people can help you to protect and improve your mental wellbeing

However, I’ve been thinking vaguely for a while about the fact that we’re all so connected, and expect everyone to be similarly connected and responsive. I’m sure we can all think of times when we’ve received an email at night, only to have a follow up email ping into our inbox by the next morning because we haven’t replied in the 12 (non-working) hours in between. Maybe we’ve sometimes been the pinger, too.

I was recently at a conference, and realised, about a third of the way into the morning session, that I’d been so busy tweeting the highlights that I hadn’t engaged as deeply as I normally would. Tweeting at conferences is kind of expected now, and as I searched the conference hashtag, it became apparent that I was far from alone in doing this. But – shocker! – when I put the phone down and moved away from the hashtag, I was better able to listen to and think about the topic being discussed. In short, I got way more out of it. Read the rest of this entry »

Picture of man driving while drinking coffee and texting on his mobile phone. Caption reads: Multitasking - because we needed another word for As I type this blog post, I have half an eye on the telly and periodically flick to my Twitter notifications because, obviously, it’s important.

And, anyway, it’s a given, in our technology-dominated culture, that we should be able to manage the competing distractions of social media, email, cat videos on the Internet (not to mention the actual, real life ‘distractions’ of friends and family), while meeting our deadlines, completing our projects and, obviously, finishing up that next killer paper. In fact, I’d bet a Jaffa Cake (so you know I mean business) that every job description I’ve seen in the last few years has highlighted the need to be able to multitask. But, recently, I’ve started to think that, actually, multi-tasking might be for losers. Or, at least, that it might not be the panacea for all our productivity woes that we’ve been led to believe. Read the rest of this entry »