Archives for posts with tag: #sheffvista

Each Friday we post a new v i s t a profile, a career beyond the academy story (use the tags at the bottom of the post to find the entire list). These posts accompany our curated events to support post-PhD career transitions, v i s t a mentoring, and also #sheffvista on Twitter.

Job title and company: Senior Managing Editor, British Dental Journal (@The_BDJ) and BDJ Open, Springer Nature

Approximate salary range for your type of role: ~ £35 to £50k. Starting salary in scientific publishing: around £27-32k depending on role level

Ruth Doherty headshot.jpgI never knew what I wanted to do ‘when I grew up’ – to be honest I still don’t! But when I had to make decisions along the way I always found it difficult to narrow down to just one thing – so for example, in my Leaving Cert in Ireland I chose a mix of humanities, business and science subjects to keep my options open. When I have been forced to focus, for example during the latter stages of my chemistry degree, I really missed learning about different things. I think that’s why I enjoy working in publishing – no day is the same. My current role provides me with the opportunity to use lots of different skills, to keep learning and also to meet interesting people.

How did I get here?

I did a PhD in organometallic chemistry (on complexes with phosphacyclahexones in case you are desperate to know) in Bristol, finishing in the lab in 2006 and submitting my thesis in 2007. At the same time as writing up I was lucky enough to get a graduate position at the Royal Society of Chemistry in Cambridge as a Technical Editor, working on a number of different journals. Publishing meant that I could use my chemistry knowledge and training outside the lab. The role involved working on all the stages of a journal article following acceptance, right through to publication. I was predominantly copy-editing physical and inorganic chemistry articles, and applying journal style to them, as well as publishing issues.

Next, in the same year, an opportunity arose to make a sideways move to become an Assistant Editor on the inorganic chemistry team at the RSC. This was around the time I submitted my PhD thesis allowing me to get my evenings and weekends back which was a relief. As an Assistant Editor I was responsible for the pre-acceptance stages in the life of an article. This meant commissioning content, attending conferences to promote the journals and meet authors, choosing referees for articles once submitted and making decisions on whether or not they were suitable for publication on the basis of the reports. I also dealt with Associate Editors, academics based externally who were making decisions on papers and running the peer review process for a proportion of submissions. I really enjoyed the people side of things and there was a nice mix of strategic work and more routine tasks, which can be therapeutic!

It’s worth saying at this point that the way in which journals are run and the particular roles within publishing vary greatly. So even those that have the same job title, e.g. Assistant Editor or Publisher, can vary greatly in the day-to-day work involved and levels of responsibility. It all depends how the journals are set up – so a Production Editor role may involve copy-editing and even layout of an article on a page at one journal, and at another it might have a more administrative/managerial emphasis whereby you find yourself supervising the outsourcing of article editing to a team based overseas and organising the processes etc. on how this is done rather than doing the editing yourself. These roles can vary even within a particular publishing house, not just between companies. So I’d advise that you keep an eye on the job description and tasks, not just the title, in job adverts so you can make sure the role appeals to you.

After a year and a bit as an Assistant Editor, I was promoted to Deputy Editor of the same journal portfolio. The promotion opportunity came via a maternity role and I would always advise someone to take advantage of temporary opportunities such as maternity cover and secondment roles to help you to get higher level and/or different experience. I found this really helped me to advance my career, particularly as I didn’t have quite enough experience to move to the next step on a permanent basis at that time. As a Deputy Editor I still handled manuscripts but dealt a lot more with Editorial Boards and worked closely with the editor on the strategic development of the journals. This involved making commissioning plans, carrying out market analysis, delegating tasks, and working more closely with other teams in the company, e.g. marketing. It was really at this time when I realised how much variation was available to me through publishing.

After five years at the RSC, I moved to Nature Publishing Group (now Springer Nature) in London to become Managing Editor at the British Dental Journal, the official journal of the British Dental Association. I made this move mainly because I wanted to gain experience in working for a different publisher. It was also a promotion that allowed me to move to London, where I had always wanted to live, for a while at least. This new position allowed me to continue working in publishing but also to try out a completely different subject area: dentistry. This was a challenge but I was amazed to discover just how much of what I had learnt at the RSC was transferable. This role involves people management – and all the recruitment, training and development involved there – as well as even more strategy and policy work, editorial board management, gap analysis and setting up new journals. I’m incredibly lucky with the BDJ that we have the chance to try out new things – so recently we have been experimenting with video content, and the extensive front half in the journal affords me the chance to write occasionally too. It’s the sort of job I like as it provides me with the freedom to make it my own.

Some career tips for publishing from me:

  • Grab your chances but equally you don’t have to say yes to everything! Take on what you enjoy when it’s possible.
  • If you want to move in to a field or move up within it, speak to colleagues or peers doing the jobs you might be interested in – they might give you more of an idea of what you would be doing and how to get to where you want to go. Sometimes they might even think of you when they are recruiting and give you a leg up!
  • Technology and marketing skills are increasingly important in publishing and media. It will certainly help to have some insight into these areas.

Best of luck for the future!

Where can researchers look for jobs like yours? Publisher’s own webpages and jobs boards (The Guardian, Nature Jobs), publishing recruitment agencies (e.g. Atwood Tate, Morgan Healy, Inspired Selection. etc )

 What professional/accrediting bodies, or qualifications are relevant to where you work? Generally for STM Publishing a science or medical degree (often PhD) required. Association of Learned and Society Publishers (@alpsp) and the International Association of STM Publishers (@STMAssoc) might have useful information.

Each Friday we post a new v i s t a profile, a career beyond the academy story (use the tags at the bottom of the post to find the entire list). These posts accompany our curated events to support post-PhD career transitions, v i s t a mentoring, and also #sheffvista on Twitter.

Job Title and Company:  Regulatory Affairs & Product Registration Officer, Randox Laboratories Ltd.

Approximate salary range for your type of role: Negotiable, relative to experience. The Regulatory Affairs Professionals Society (RAPS) has a useful salary calculator that you can use as a starting guide.

Dr Amber Glanfield.jpg

Towards the latter half of my PhD candidature I had become fairly sure that a career in academia wasn’t something I wanted to pursue long-term. I enjoyed lab work and being a part of the scientific process but I didn’t harbour dreams of being a Professor and wasn’t so keen on the grant funding-cycle battles that seem part of the game. Read the rest of this entry »

Each Friday we post a new v i s t a profile, a career beyond the academy story (use the tags at the bottom of the post to find the entire list). These posts accompany our curated events to support post-PhD career transitions, v i s t a mentoring, and also #sheffvista on Twitter.

Job title and company: Research Information Analyst, Research Services, University of Sheffield

Approximate salary range for your type of role: £30 to £42k

IMAG5648.jpgGrowing up, I had decided that I wanted to become a medical doctor; however, work experience stints in the local A&E and nursing home showed me that I was actually more interested in the underlying science of medicine. This led me to read Biomedical Science at the University of Sheffield, further cementing my love of science, and inspiring me to undertake a PhD to get right to the cutting edge of scientific research. Read the rest of this entry »

Each Friday we post a new v i s t a profile, a career beyond the academy story (use the tags at the bottom of the post to find the entire list). These posts accompany our curated events to support post-PhD career transitions, v i s t a mentoring, and also #sheffvista on Twitter.

Job title and company: Challenge Driven Support Manager, Research Services, University of Sheffield

Approximate salary range for your type of role: £40-£54k

Like many people of my generation, my career pathway feels more like a dandelion seed wafting about in the breeze waiting for a gust of wind to find a place to settle before pushing out roots. Undoubtedly this doesn’t sound like a well-planned venture by my younger self and even now I’m a tiny bit embarrassed to admit just how I landed in my current role. I’ll start with a description of what I do between nine till five(ish) and highlight some of the reasons why I’m now not an academic. Read the rest of this entry »

Each Friday we post a new v i s t a profile, a career beyond the academy story (use the tags at the bottom of the post to find the entire list). These posts accompany our curated events to support post-PhD career transitions, v i s t a mentoring, and also #sheffvista on Twitter.

Job title and company: Doctoral Training Partnership Manager, and Graduate School Manager

Approximate salary range for your type of role: £30-£42k

Emily is on LinkedIn and Twitter @DrEmilyG

20170920_083843.jpg Read the rest of this entry »

Each Friday we post a new v i s t a profile, a career beyond the academy story (use the tags at the bottom of the post to find the entire list). These posts accompany our curated events to support post-PhD career transitions, v i s t a mentoring, and also #sheffvista on Twitter.

Job title and company: Operational Research Analyst – Home Office

Approximate salary range for your type of role: £30-£40k

Ross’ LinkedIn profile

IMG_20170915_091003.jpgAt 18, I took what now seems like the hopelessly quaint view that if you could, you should go to university and study something that interests you (admittedly, this was when tuition fees were a grand a year, and maintenance grants were still a thing). I ended up studying Biochemistry, and then, keen to experience my field from the front line of research, I stayed on at the same University and did a PhD. Read the rest of this entry »

Each Friday we post a new v i s t a profile, a career beyond the academy story (use the tags at the bottom of the post to find the entire list). These posts accompany our curated events to support post-PhD career transitions, v i s t a mentoring, and also #sheffvista on Twitter.

Job title and company: Assistant Departmental Administrator (Projects), University of Cambridge

Approximate salary range for your type of role: Grade 7 (£29,000-£34,000)

annajenkin.jpgI completed my PhD in History at the University of Sheffield in August 2015 and moved straight out of academia. I submitted my thesis on the Friday and got my first job on the Wednesday following! I’d worked on a lot of different projects in public engagement and on studentship boards during my doctoral studies and I was keen to see where these different paths could lead. Read the rest of this entry »

Each Friday we post a new v i s t a profile, a career beyond the academy story (use the tags at the bottom of the post to find the entire list). These posts accompany our curated events to support post-PhD career transitions, v i s t a mentoring, and also #sheffvista on Twitter.

Job title and company: Online Content Developer for the Centre for Academic Practice Enhancement (CAPE) at Middlesex University.

My academic career began as a Lecturer in Languages at Coventry University. I also tutored in Business for Cambridge Education Group in Coventry, and I complemented this experience with further roles as a research assistant at University of Warwick and research associate at University of Leicester and juggled all these roles whilst I studied for my PhD. Read the rest of this entry »

Each Friday we post a new v i s t a profile, a career beyond the academy story (use the tags at the bottom of the post to find the entire list). These posts accompany our curated events to support post-PhD career transitions, v i s t a mentoring, and also #sheffvista on Twitter.

Job title and company: I think my job title is ‘freelance training consultant’ or it could be ‘company director’. Either way, I am self-employed as someone who goes around running training workshops for clients, and my company is called Cambridge Training Associates.

Approximate salary range for your type of role: The salary for someone who does what I do and is self-employed is hard to predict but to give you a ballpark number, let’s say £35 – £55k.

I do have a company webpage and a Twitter account: And because I’m self-employed, I created and run them all myself – I hope you like them! Website for my company. Twitter – @camtrainingassoc And LinkedIn. Read the rest of this entry »

Each Friday we post a new v i s t a profile, a career beyond the academy story (use the tags at the bottom of the post to find the entire list). These posts accompany our curated events to support post-PhD career transitions, v i s t a mentoring, and also #sheffvista on Twitter.

Job title and company: Core Medical Trainee, Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

Approximate salary range for your type of role: Variable according to banding supplement during rotation.  All salary information can be found here.

I really enjoyed my undergraduate degree in genetics at the University of Sheffield and found that the aspects I enjoyed most were relating to human diseases.  After completing my degree I contemplated applying to medicine but at that stage I wasn’t convinced that this was the career for me.  I loved my undergraduate project so stayed on and undertook a PhD investigating the repair of DNA double strand breaks during meiosis. Read the rest of this entry »