This blog comes to you from the interdisciplinary Researcher Professional Development team at the University of Sheffield. We’ll be updating on researcher issues, national news and trends, key achievements for the team, and other things that research staff, and staff development professionals will find of interest.

Each Friday we post a new v i s t a profile, a career beyond the academy story (use the tags at the bottom of the post to find the entire list). These posts accompany our curated events to support post-PhD career transitions, v i s t a mentoring, and also #sheffvista on Twitter.

Twitter: @OJ301

Job title and company: Academic Skills Development Adviser at 301 Student Skills and Development Centre

Approximate salary range for your type of role: £35-39k

OJ.jpgFirst, a confession: I have no career masterplan. The path I have taken to my current job has been one of trial and error, missteps and serendipitous accidents. It is tempting to seek a retrospective kind of order in the chaos, but that would not do justice to the uncertainty of the journey.

As an undergrad I never saw myself as a researcher, but when the opportunity arose to apply for a PhD in Soviet art history (a longstanding area of interest) I jumped at the opportunity. It took me a year to ‘get’ what I was supposed to be doing, but eventually lost myself happily in the Moscow archives, where my project began to take shape. I’m probably unusual in that I loved writing up my PhD and was inspired to apply for funding to extend my research career. I was lucky enough to get a British Academy Postdoctoral Fellowship and was convinced that the road to professorship was laid out before me.

OJ Moscow.jpg

Wrong! A miserable year of applying for academic jobs ensued and I amassed quite a collection of near misses (‘you did well, but you are our second choice’…yeah right). On reflection, my heart might not have been in it, which tends to count for a lot. Fortunately, my postdoc was a fantastic opportunity to build up all sorts of other experience: conference organising, public engagement events, outreach, teaching and professional development. Teaching and working with students was part of the job that I enjoyed the most and I took CiLT and enrolled on the MEd in Learning and Teaching.

This expanded my networks within the University and gave me the confidence to try something different. When a new HEA-funded project on feedback came up in Academic and Learning Services, I put in a speculative application and somehow got the job (I was the ‘wildcard candidate’ as my line manager later told me). This was an eye-opener and a steep learning curve. There was a whole world out there beyond my academic department! I was the frog who had spent its life living in a single leaf discovering it was part of a whole tree. The job was a good stepping stone for a researcher, in that it was a standalone project that benefitted from a degree of academic rigour, but gave me the opportunity to work across faculties, services and departments.

The project gave me the skills and experience and most importantly the confidence I needed to apply for a permanent role in learning development. I now work at 301 Student Skills and Development Centre as an Academic Skills Development Adviser and I love my job! I get the best of all worlds: I get to work directly with students (helping them learn how to learn), with researchers (supporting them in their own learning and teaching) and with a fantastic small team of colleagues.

Calendar.jpgAs part of a relatively young department I get to try out a lot of new things within my role. Most days involve collaboration with academic departments or other professional services departments working to embed academic skills into the curriculum or providing input into institutional projects and initiatives. This might involve working 1:1 with academic colleagues or leading workshops for groups of 250+ students. I really enjoy the challenge of developing content for teaching sessions and aligning them with the needs of different disciplines and cohorts. It has been good to get out of my comfort zone to work with scientists, engineers and medical students and think about what learning looks like in different educational contexts. I also work with a team of PhD student tutors to support them in their learning and teaching at 301. Seeing the tutor team develop their confidence and skill as tutors is one of the most rewarding parts of my role.

OJ workshop.JPGI feel as though my job has a more immediate impact than was possible through my research, but it also provides an alternative way to make the most of my research background. For better or worse a PhD provides me with a platform to communicate with academic colleagues and my experience of the trials and tribulations of research gives me an insight into some of the challenges faced by students at all levels. My take on it is that we all (students and staff) play a part in the bigger process of learning and making a contribution to knowledge. My role in that process has shifted, but I still find it hugely motivating to be a part of that rich learning environment.

To offer one tip to others considering a career path outside academia: don’t expect it to be a well-metalled road. Instead, embrace the meandering, obstacle-strewn journey for the adventure that it is.

Where can researchers look for jobs like yours? Jobs.ac.uk is the go-to site for me for jobs both within and outside a traditional academic role.

What professional/accrediting bodies, or qualifications are relevant to where you work? The HEA provide a useful route to accreditation (aligned to its UK Professional Standards Framework for Teaching and Supporting Learning in Higher Education). See here for the University of Sheffield route into this. This is a good way to start evidencing and articulating your impact and to gain recognition that is recognised nationally for excellence in practice. I would also strongly recommend taking a MEd, as it provides a great opportunity to develop an area of specialist knowledge within learning and teaching.

Each Friday we post a new v i s t a profile, a career beyond the academy story (use the tags at the bottom of the post to find the entire list). These posts accompany our curated events to support post-PhD career transitions, v i s t a mentoring, and also #sheffvista on Twitter.

Twitter: @JW_Donald

Job title and company: Strategy & Policy Manager, Skills and Careers Unit @BBSRC

Approximate salary range for your type of role: ~£37-43k

Towards the end of my time spent completing a PhD in Molecular Microbiology I came to the conclusion that academia is probably best suited to those who really enjoy research. This realisation came while at an EMBO summer school in Corsica where at the numerous beach and bar breaks the general chat invariably centred on people’s research projects; although I found my PhD project interesting, I really didn’t want to talk about it on the beach. Read the rest of this entry »

Who’s writing their thesis? 

Come on, who is writing? It’s my view, and the view of a lot of scholars who study writing in the doctoral degree, that everyone should have said yes to that question. See this assertion from  Barbara Kamler & Pat Thomson, taken from their 2014 book, ‘Helping Doctoral Students Write: Pedagogies for supervision’:

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Read the rest of this entry »

Each Friday we post a new v i s t a profile, a career beyond the academy story (use the tags at the bottom of the post to find the entire list). These posts accompany our curated events to support post-PhD career transitions, v i s t a mentoring, and also #sheffvista on Twitter.

Twitter: @alisheff

Job title and company: Enterprise Education Manager, The University of Sheffield

Approximate salary range for your type of role: ~£28-38k

I’ve been at The University of Sheffield for thirteen years now, first as a student and now as a member of staff – I often joke that I’m institutionalised! I never really planned it that way, however, it just seems to be how my career and my personal life have conspired together through happenstance.

1910390_505806278612_8422_n.jpgI studied archaeology to PhD level, but now I work in curriculum development and enterprise education – sometimes I wonder myself exactly how that happened! Read the rest of this entry »

This is a guest post from Elizabeth Adams who manages researcher development opportunities for early-career researchers at the University of Glasgow, from postgraduate research students to academic staff. Elizabeth previously worked for the Royal Society of Chemistry and has a PhD in polymer chemistry.

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Working out of a central office in the University, I often feel a conflict between thinking about the individual PhD experience and about the systems and processes to ensure consistency for all of our 2,400 PGRs. Is there a place for central support or ‘community-building’ activity or should we focus our efforts on the policy? Read the rest of this entry »

Each Friday we post a new v i s t a profile, a career beyond the academy story (use the tags at the bottom of the post to find the entire list). These posts accompany our curated events to support post-PhD career transitions, v i s t a mentoring, and also #sheffvista on Twitter.

Job title and company: Scientific Content Manager and Global Campaign Manager, , Merck KgAa, Darmstadt, Germany

Approximate salary range for your type of role: Variable €40-55K

HEC2015-2.jpgWhen you come across someone in a role where you think “ooh, I’d like to do that job” it seems that the answer to the question of how they got there is always “well, I just fell into it really” or “I got lucky”. I feel the same, but obviously, there is more to it than that. There always is. Read the rest of this entry »

This is a guest post from Charlotte Turnbull, Coaching & Mentoring Consultant

mortar board image.pngThe 14th November 2016 was a great day. I graduated from my MSc in Coaching & Mentoring from Sheffield Hallam University. Having worked in the HE sector for almost 25 years in HR and development roles across both universities in Sheffield, it was great to be in the audience this time rather than the platform party. But another change had also occurred. My dissertation research into the role of mentoring within a women’s leadership development scheme had led me to a series of powerful realisations around the role of mentoring and mentors within the development of leaders. Read the rest of this entry »

At a recent ‘Managing yourself and your PhD course’ I asked attendees to list their issues. The second biggest issue was procrastination.

procratination phdsProcrastination can be defined as “to voluntarily delay an intended course of action despite expecting to be worse off for the delay.” [1] and that’s certainly a problem!

Why do we deliberately not do what we know we should be doing even if it causes us pain? Read the rest of this entry »

Each Friday we post a new v i s t a profile, a career beyond the academy story (use the tags at the bottom of the post to find the entire list). These posts accompany our curated events to support post-PhD career transitions, v i s t a mentoring, and also #sheffvista on Twitter.

Job title and company: Mentoring & Coaching Manager, University of Sheffield

Approximate salary range for your type of role: £35,000-£55,000 across the UK

I did science A-levels, a science degree and a PhD in molecular biology because it seemed at the time that’s what clever people did. When I (finally) finished my PhD I knew it was time to move on to a job where I would feel less idiotic all the time. I thought I’d better make a more informed decision about what to do next and so I trotted down to a careers service appointment. it turned out that a PhD with precisely ZERO extra curricular activities wasn’t massively attractive to employers, even when supplemented with my time pushing Sarah Lee gateaux in Iceland. Read the rest of this entry »

Each Friday we post a new v i s t a profile, a career beyond the academy story (use the tags at the bottom of the post to find the entire list). These posts accompany our curated events to support post-PhD career transitions, v i s t a mentoring, and also #sheffvista on Twitter.

Job title and company: Admissions, Outreach and Engagement Manager, Imperial College London

Approximate salary range for your type of role: £45,000-£60,000

Bioengineering Dept pages | Twitter: @J_DoubleS

pwpimage.html;jsessionid=1vtSYr0CJBMpkWPvHfYbJfJFCb3cCh9fHqk9psy3vxZ8LQSj3Jpd!-2068266046.jpegI have always been passionate about making science and engineering accessible to others, whether that was through research talks or posters during my PhD, or to members of the public, school children, MPs, community groups and patients through my career.

The catalyst for me was a course created by Professor Noel Sharkey at University of Sheffield, where amongst other sessions we had a talk from Fiona Fox, Director and now CEO of the Science Media Centre. After meeting Fiona, I interned at the Science Media Centre during my PhD and it really opened my eyes to a world outside of academia, and the impact of good and bad communication of science. Read the rest of this entry »